ETIQUETTE

Addressing Etiquette 

The wedding invitation is the first impression your guests will have of your wedding. You want it to reflect your special occasion and give guests a glimpse of what to expect. A traditional, formal script in black ink with your guest's full title and name lets them know it is a formal event. A casual, modern script in purple ink with your guest's title and common name lets them know it will be an informal, fun-filled event. It is your day, your choice!

Do keep in mind, wedding envelopes should be addressed by hand, never typed (according to most wedding etiquette books and Martha Stewart.) 

Please note that proper etiquette says to spell out almost everything in wedding addressing. That means, no abbreviations for street, boulevard, avenue, apartment, state names, etcetera. For wedding envelopes, five digit zip codes are appropriate.

Other key tips:
     * numbers under twenty should be spelled out
     * if the female is a widow, the name is Mrs. John (husbands name) Smith
     * if the female is divorced, the name is Mrs. Mary(her first name) Smith
     * the word "and" is what marries a couple, even if their last names are different
     * if two people are living together, simply put each name on a separate line in alphabetical order
     * professional titles go first, even if it is female. For example:
                      Dr. Mary Smith and
                            Mr. James Smith 
      * use "junior" or "Jr." NOT "Junior" 
 
Invitations should be mailed 6 to 8 weeks before the wedding. If you did a save the date mailing, there is some flexibility. You should book a calligrapher as soon as you order your invitations. Always order additional envelopes, 10% is a good estimate.

Crane's is considered the best source for proper wedding invitation and envelope etiquette.  

No comments: